InMeditations

Mother Nature’s Wrath

While some of it is now a haze, it’s her scream I remember most; a high -pitched scream filled with terror. I never heard my mother scream that way before. I looked at my sister whose face was nestled on my shoulder as she continued to sleep soundly. I turned to my brother who was standing right beside me and I remember the look on his face, it was as if Death had just summoned him. I realize now there’s no more a powerful force than the wrath of Mother Nature.

Hurricane AndrewI was 10 years old when Hurricane Andrew hit. 22 years later, I’m still afraid of the
howling of the wind, always looking outside as my eyes seek the nearest tree. How violently the branches fold against the wind is my indication of what’s coming. It may seem friendly or mysterious to most, but to me it looks and sounds like the beginning of something bad. Wind

Natural disasters are inevitable and through the years I have heard of many that remind me of Andrew, though the survivor’s experiences and situations may be vastly different. Many even make my story sound microscopic. There’s the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, Katrina (2005) and the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami which killed over 230,000
Tsunami 2004people and affected 14 countries. A wave that, according to sources, travelled as much as 3,000 miles. So is surviving the earth’s most deadliest phenomena, “The Impossible” (now a major motion picture starring Naomi Watts and Ewan McGregor) miraculous? Yes.

Here’s the real life story of the family who inspired the new film. It’s a remarkable tale of survival, dread, grief and loss. A story which encompasses the indestructible strength of the human soul.

Have you ever experienced a natural disaster? I would love to hear your story. Please feel free to comment.

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/woman/real_life/4727569/boxing-day-tsunami-maria-alvarez-the-impossible.html …

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4 Comments

  • Yessy

    Interesting that you wrote about this experience. I thought I was overreacting but for years after Andrew whenever a thunderstorm came to town, I would climb on the couch and peer out the window; if the leaves on the front door neighbors’ tree would flip onto their lime green underside, I knew there was trouble. I only knew this because of Andrew. I don’t have any stories about natural disasters other than I cry for those wounded by them. It’s terrible to look at disasters this way but they help bring many of us together. One never truly sees the strength in unity until one sees unity after a disaster. You would think as human beings we would always help one another but alas that’s not the case.

    February 20, 2013 at 9:29 pm Reply
  • soulconalas

    Definitely not overreacting. Hurricane Andrew, as do many natural disasters, have a traumatic impact on us cognitively and emotionally.

    Thank you for sharing your story with me.
    -SoulconAlas

    February 21, 2013 at 4:53 pm Reply
  • Jocelyn P.

    I remember experiencing Hurricane Andrew so vividly as well. I was 9 yrs old. It was the peak of summer and I had sea lice all over my body and was very uncomfortable even though my mom tried doing everything possible to heal the itching. As a method to keep my sister and I calm, our mom and dad set up the living room with sleeping bags, pillows, board games, and even a doggie bed for our crazy Pomeranian Candy. They did such a good job at keeping us entertained, we actually had fun and thought we were having a slumber party. Looking back, I now realize we were all in that room because it was the only place with no windows. I slept peacefully through the howling winds and woke up the next morning and assessed the damage with my dad against my moms advice. The giant satellite dish (everyone had in the 90’s) that was in our backyard was torn from the ground and across the neighbors yard, no power in the house, leaks in the ceiling, roof of our screened in porch gone. We were one of the lucky ones. I learned a great lesson during this tragedy from my parents when we joined caravans to take gallons of water to Homestead: There is always someone who is worse off than you, helping those less fortunate is the best way to show your grateful. Thanks Lin for this post and reminding me how lucky we were!!

    February 23, 2013 at 9:40 pm Reply
  • sanjeetsen

    The Uttarakhand tragedy now in India – devastating and a very unfortunate state of affairs right now during the rescue/recovery stage – Another Day in Paradise (Phil Collins) – apt

    July 1, 2013 at 4:49 am Reply
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